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Nuns As Historians in Early Modern Germany (Oxford Modern Languages and Literature Monographs)

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Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Number of Pages240
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7404059M
ISBN 100199256713
ISBN 109780199256716

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Get this from a library! Nuns as historians in early modern Germany. [Charlotte Woodford] -- "The literary history of early modern German convents is a much neglected field. Nuns' writings were rarely printed and generally only read within their institution. In this study - the first to. Bringing together for the first time a significant collection of primary source material, Nuns as Historians in Early Modern Germany also includes a number of illuminating case studies, such as a biography of a fifteenth-century visionary, a prioress's diary, and an abbess's chronicle from the Thirty Years' War. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus. Nuns as Historians introduces women's contributions to a discourse generally considered to be the province of men: history writing. It examines the tradition of history writing and chronicles in Catholic convents in the German Empire during the early modern period, which is overlooked even in most studies of monastic : Charlotte Woodford.

This is the first study to highlight the significance of nuns' writings in early modern Germany. Combining scholarly analysis with illuminating case studies--such as an abbess's account of the Reformation, a prioress's diary from the Thirty Years' War, and a biography of a fifteenth-century visionary--Charlotte Woodford introduces the much neglected female historians of the era, and sets their. Nuns as Historians in Early Modern Germany. Oxford: Oxford University Press, xiv + pp. $, cloth, ISBN Reviewed by Amy E. Leonard Published on H-German (October, ) The last two decades have witnessed an ex‐ plosion of works on religious women in early modern Europe. Focusing especially on the. ); Charlotte Woodford, Nuns as Historians in Early Modern Germany (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, ). 2 For example, it is a striking absence in this otherwise excellent volume: Andrea Pearson, ed., Women and Portraits in Early Modern Europe (Aldershot: Ashgate, ). This chapter examines the function of literacy in nuns' daily lives during the early modern period. It begins by examining the social history of early modern nuns, reasons for entering a convent, responsibilities held by women, and differences between monastic orders in this period. It traces the importance of reading for nuns' spirituality from the monastic reform of the fifteenth century to.

Read the full-text online edition of Convents Confront the Reformation: Catholic and Protestant Nuns in Germany (). Convents Confront the Reformation: Catholic and Protestant Nuns in Germany * Nuns as Historians in Early Modern Germany By Charlotte Woodford Oxford University Press. The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany. Family Life in Early Modern Times The Challenge of Modernity: German Social and Cultural Studies, Gender and the Modern Research University: The Admission of Women to German Higher Education, The Cult of Health and Beauty in Germany: A Social History,   Ute Lotz-Heumann on How Historians Grapple with the German Reformation. Two (If Not More) Historiographies of the German Reformation. T he German Reformation has at least two vibrant historiographies that sometimes intersect and sometimes go their separate ways: German historiography, which itself was split when Germany was divided during the second half of the twentieth century, and .   Dr Jennifer Hillman, review of Women and the Counter-Reformation in Early Modern Munster, (review no. ) DOI: /RiH// Date accessed: 12 May,